REFORESTATION

How You Can Help

Conserve Natural Forests’ goal is to implement practical, proven methods of forest restoration in order to mitigate the damages resulting from deforestation and forest degradation. We strive for an optimal balance between widespread and effective forest restoration – measured by the conservation of biodiversity, ecological health, and carbon sequestration – in conjunction with improving the economic and environmental quality of life for the local communities within our engaged region. CNF aims to be an ambassador for forest restoration, sustainable land practices and wildlife conservation in Northern Thailand.

Conserve Natural Forests’ goal is to implement practical, proven methods of forest restoration in order to mitigate the damages resulting from deforestation and forest degradation. We strive for an optimal balance between widespread and effective forest restoration – measured by the conservation of biodiversity, ecological health, and carbon sequestration – in conjunction with improving the economic and environmental quality of life for the local communities within our engaged region. CNF aims to be an ambassador for forest restoration, sustainable land practices and wildlife conservation in Northern Thailand.

WHY PLANT TREES?

Tropical forest cover has declined between 35-50% since the pre-industrial era. It is estimated that if the current rate of deforestation continues, tropical forest ecosystems may collapse beyond repair between 2100 and 2150. The loss of tropical forests has devastating effects at every level: local biodiversity and ecosystem function, global climate patterns, as well as for humans relying on the services provided by forests, including clean water, clean air, medicines, and food.

Between 1900 and 2006, forest cover in Thailand decreased from an estimated 85% to less than 25%. This rapid deforestation can be explained by two principal causes: the harvest of lucrative timber such as teak and rosewood as well as a sharp increase in land use change toward urban development and agriculture in order to support Thailand’s booming population growth.

The effects of rapid tropical deforestation are well documented and include:

Loss of biodiversity, which can have devastating effects on ecosystem function and resilience.

Demonstrable contributions to climate change – more CO2 released and less captured.

A sharp decrease in ecosystem services provided by forests, including water retention, water quality, and soil health.

Increased pressure on forest-dependent communities who rely on NTFPs (Non-Timber Forest Products) for their well-being and survival.

An important part of our project is to restore damaged landscapes by planting a variety of native species and managing restored land for several years before the regenerated forest can sustain itself. Last year we planted 190,000 trees in the Mae Hong Son province of Thailand with the help of the Thai army and the local communitY. This year our goal is a million trees.

HOW WE DO IT

CNF uses the Framework Species Method to guide us in our reforestation projects. We plant between 25 and 40 native species on our restoration sites depending on a variety of factors, including altitude, average temperature, soil quality, and the species composition of the surrounding ecosystem. 

Each tree we plant provides a specific service in the forest: Some trees fix nitrogen in the soil or retain moisture during the dry season. Fast-growing pioneer trees flourish in the sunlight and shade out weeds while climax trees grow slower but live longer. We also plant a mix of fruiting and flowering trees to attract seed-dispersing animals and insects to our land in order to enrich biodiversity and promote healthy succession. 

Our restoration projects typically require 3 to 5 years of management. We use a variety of Assisted Natural Regeneration (ANR) techniques – including weeding, mulching, enrichment plantings, and natural fertilization – to maximize the success rates of our trees. After about five years, nature takes over and the forest becomes self-regulating. Birds and mammals eat the seeds and disperse them to other areas, naturally increasing the size of the forests. The results have been astounding, but there remains a great deal of work left to be done!

Want to find out more? Send us a message!

Want to contribute to our cause?

Conserve Natural Forests was built and continues to grow thanks to the generosity of like-minded people who support our work. We would not be where we are today without their help. If you would like to know more about how you can contribute toward restoring Thailand’s beautiful ecosystems and saving endangered species, please consider donating to one of our projects.

Want to contribute to our cause?

Conserve Natural Forests was built and continues to grow thanks to the generosity of like-minded people who support our work. We would not be where we are today without their help. If you would like to know more about how you can contribute toward restoring Thailand’s beautiful ecosystems and saving endangered species, please consider donating to one of our projects.

Want to find out more? Send us a message!

Sign up to receive regular updates from cnf

Find us online and follow us on our journey.

Building a sustainable future, one tree at a time.

info@conservenaturalforests.org

Sign up to receive regular updates from cnf

Find us online and follow us on our journey.

Building a sustainable future, one tree at a time.

info@conservenaturalforests.org

Sign up to receive regular updates from cnf

Find us online and follow us on our journey.

Building a sustainable future, one tree at a time.

info@conservenaturalforests.org